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Why Do Onions Make Us Cry?

Onions are one of the most common staple foods around the globe. Ironically, for a vegetable so delicious, they can often be tear-jerkers.

Read on to learn why onions cause your eyes to tear and sting, and what you can do to minimize discomfort.

Why Does Cutting Onions Cause Tearing?

Onions produce a sulfur compound called propyl sulfoxide that is stored in the cells of the onion bulb (the part of the onion we eat). Onions grow underground, where they can be eaten by all types of creatures. This odorous sulfuric compound acts as a deterrent to small animals with big appetites.

When one slices into an onion and breaks open its cells, the sulfur compound is released and mixes with the moisture in the air — turning it into smelly and irritating sulfuric acid. When this chemical rises up and comes in contact with your eyes, it stings!

To keep your eyes from potentially being damaged from this chemical exposure, your brain triggers your eyes to tear and flush out the irritating gas particles. Once enough tears have flushed out the sulfuric acids particles from the eye, clear vision and comfort is usually restored. Although your eyes may sting and feel unpleasant, symptoms are temporary and the sulfuric acid won’t damage your eyes.

How Can I Reduce Eye Discomfort When Chopping Onions?

Most experienced chefs will tell you that chilling your onions in the fridge for at least 30 minutes before slicing them will reduce the amount of tearing they cause. Propyl sulfoxide escapes slower in cooler temperatures, reducing the amount of sulfuric acid in the air.

You can also try cutting the onions at arm’s length, or direct the odorous air away with a small fan. Some say that chopping onions immersed in water also helps. Another option is to wear kitchen goggles to protect your eyes.

Furthermore, try to use fresh onions whenever possible. The longer an onion has been stored, the more likely it will induce tearing and discomfort. Try to avoid slicing near the root end of the bulb, as that area has the highest concentration of sulfuric compounds.

Still Having Eye Problems Out of the Kitchen?

If you frequently suffer from eye irritation — and not just while cutting onions — we can help. At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we treat a wide range of eye conditions and can provide you with the treatment and relief you seek.

For further questions or to schedule an eye exam, call us today.

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 314-423-3874 or book an appointment online to see one of our Overland eye doctors.

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REFERENCES

https://www.britannica.com/story/why-do-onions-make-you-cry

https://theconversation.com/why-do-onions-make-you-cry-129519

How Bad Is It to Rub Your Eyes?

According to eye care experts, eye rubbing is a total no-win for your vision! Your eye tissues and the surrounding skin are delicate and sensitive. So when your eyes feel sore or tired, our eye doctor in Overland and St. Charles urges you to hold back from risking damage by rubbing them.

If you suffer from eye irritation and feel like you need to rub your eyes, book an eye exam instead, to determine the root of your problem and get soothing treatment.

5 Reasons to Avoid Eye Rubbing

  1. Increases your risk of ocular disease: Eye rubbing can compromise the strength of your cornea, weakening and thinning the tissue so it changes shape from a dome to a cone. (This condition is called keratoconus.)
  2. Corneal scratches: Even though corneal abrasions usually health on their own within a few days, they can also develop into a sight-threatening corneal ulcer.
  3. Worsens myopia: If you’re nearsighted, eye rubbing can actually make your myopia deteriorate. Think your vision has worsened? Book an eye exam in Overland or St. Charles.
  4. Eye infection: Fingers get into many things, picking up germs and bacteria all day long. When you rub your eyes, you can transfer the bacteria. Currently, during the COVID-19 pandemic, eye rubbing is particularly discouraged, because studies have shown the virus can infiltrate ocular tissue.
  5. Dark bags and bloodshot eyes: Vigorous rubbing can burst the tiny blood vessels in your eye, leading to red eyes. It can also cause swelling under your eyes, giving you a raccoon-like look.

In sum, even if eye rubbing leads to short-term relief, it can also cause long-term damage. Only a comprehensive eye exam will help you benefit from treatment to relieve your discomfort.

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 314-423-3874 or book an appointment online to see one of our Overland eye doctors.

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How Does Smoking Affect You and Your Family’s Vision?

You probably know smoking is bad for your lungs and heart, and you’re also likely aware of the dangers of second-hand smoke. What about its impact on your eyes? Did you know smoking puts your eyes at risk for serious, sight-threatening eye diseases?

Smoking and exposure to second-hand smoke pose an increased threat of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts. Both of these conditions can lead to vision loss and blindness, and they can be diagnosed with a comprehensive eye exam by our eye doctor in Overland and St. Charles.

Effects of Smoking On Your Eyes

Smoking causes changes in your eyes, which can progress and lead to vision loss. In fact, people who smoke are twice as likely to develop AMD, and two to three times more likely to develop cataracts than nonsmokers. If you’ve already been diagnosed with AMD, you may be able to slow the deterioration of the disease by quitting smoking.

In addition to AMD and cataracts, smoking can lead to:

  • Dry eye syndrome
  • Damage to color and contrast vision
  • Diabetic retinopathy, if you have diabetes
  • Optic nerve problems
  • Uveitis (inflammation of the middle layer of the eye)
  • In women who are pregnant, exposure to smoke increases the baby’s likelihood of vision problems, including strabismus, Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP, since smoking is associated with premature birth), and other eye health complications.

Only an Eye Exam Can Detect Eye Disease Linked to Smoking

The early signs of eye disease are typically silent, which means the only reliable way to know if your eyes are healthy is by getting an eye exam. Our eye doctor in Overland and St. Charles will dilate your pupils in order to see the retinal tissues at the back of your eye more clearly and inspect for signs of damage.

The best way to protect your vision and your family’s vision against the dangers of smoking is to quit – or never take up smoking!

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 314-423-3874 or book an appointment online to see one of our Overland eye doctors.

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Two Different Colored Eyes? Let’s Talk About It

While relatively uncommon, it’s possible to have two different colored eyes – as quite a few celebrities, such as Dan Aykroyd, Kate Bosworth, Mila Kunis, Christopher Walken and Jane Seymour, can personally attest! Called heterochromia, this condition is typically benign and has no effects on visual acuity. But it can definitely contribute to an exotic, memorable appearance.

To make sure your heterochromia doesn’t indicate a problem, schedule an eye exam at one of our eye care centers in Overland, St. Charles, Maryland Heights, and and the entire city of St. Louis, Missouri. We’ll check your eye health thoroughly and provide a prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses, if needed.

3 types of heterochromia

Your eye color is determined by the amount of melanin in the iris. Blue eyes have the smallest quantity of melanin, and brown eyes have the largest amount. There are three types of heterochromia, categorized according to where the different colors are located in the eye:

  1. Complete heterochromia – The iris of one eye is an entirely different color than the iris of the other eye.
  2. Partial heterochromia (AKA sectoral heterochromia) – Only a part (or sector) of one eyes’ iris has a different color; this can occur in one or both eyes.
  3. Central heterochromia – The color near the border of the iris is different from the color near the border of the pupil. Spikes of the central color radiate from the pupil towards the middle of the iris.

Causes of heterochromia – congenital and acquired

This colorful eye condition can be congenital, meaning that it’s either present from birth, or it appeared in early childhood when the iris attained its full quantity of melanin. Congenital heterochromia is benign and genetic, or it can be the result of a genetic mutation during development of the embryo.

When heterochromia develops later in life, it is called acquired heterochromia. Typically, it happens because of a serious injury to the eye, uveitis and particular medications to treat glaucoma. Latisse eye drops, often used nowadays as a cosmetic treatment to thicken eyelashes, can also cause a color change in your iris.

Sometimes, heterochromia appears as a symptom of another health condition, such as Horner’s syndrome. This condition is the combination of partial ptosis, a constricted pupil, and the loss of the ability to sweat on half of the face. All of the symptoms are caused by a disruption of certain nerve impulses to the eye.

Heterochromia: contact lenses vs. eyeglasses

Heterochromia only requires treatment if it was caused by swelling or another underlying health problem. Otherwise, it can be left alone. However, some people are self-conscious about this condition and prefer to hide it by wearing colored contact lenses in one or both eyes. Our eye doctor in Overland, St. Charles, Maryland Heights, and and the entire city of St. Louis, Missouri, can help match you with the best tint of contact lenses to give eyes that show the same exact hue. If you require vision correction to see, both eyeglasses and contact lenses will provide sharp visual acuity – but only colored contact lenses will mask the heterochromia.

Be safe – get an eye exam

Although most cases of heterochromia are there from birth and totally harmless, if you or your child has different colored eyes, book an eye exam to rule out any other serious conditions. Once your eye doctor determines that your eyes are healthy, you can enjoy the exotic appearance heterochromia adds to your look!

If you need vision correction, your eye doctor can fit you with prescription eyeglasses from our trending optical collection, or with premium contact lenses from our full inventory. Bring your current vision prescription to Overland Optical Family Eye Care, located conveniently in Overland, St. Charles, Maryland Heights, and and the entire city of St. Louis, Missouri.

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 314-423-3874 or book an appointment online to see one of our Overland eye doctors.

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Pink Eye? It Could Be Coronavirus

How to prevent conjunctivitis and protect your eyes

When you have a virus, especially one that causes a hacking cough, runny nose, and other symptoms of a common cold or flu, it’s typical for your eyes to also get puffy and red. You may be suffering from viral conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye.

How do viruses get into your eyes?

It’s rather simple. When you’re sick, you can easily transfer viruses to your eyes by sneezing, coughing into your hands, or blowing your nose – and then touching the area around your eye.

The coronavirus – pink eye connection

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), doctors have discovered that COVID-19 can cause conjunctivitis. If you’re standing within six feet of an infected person, and they cough or sneeze, the virus can enter your eye. Alternatively, if someone sneezes and virus particles land on the shopping cart that you take and push around a store, and then you touch your eyes without washing your hands first – you’re giving the virus direct access.

However, despite the apparent ease with which coronavirus can infect eyes, the AAO reports that only about 1 – 3% of all patients with the virus contract pink eye.

Preventing pink eye

Like always, prevention is the most effective medicine! Eye care professionals recommend following these tips to help prevent getting viral conjunctivitis:

  • Wash your hands correctly

The CDC instructs people to wash their hands in accordance with these steps: wet your hands, turn off the tap, apply soap, lather and scrub for 20 seconds, turn on tap and rinse. Air dry your hands, use a disposable paper towel and discard it immediately, or use a clean (not shared) towel.

  • Keep your fingers away from your face

No rubbing or wiping your eyes! Even if you don’t feel any symptoms of coronavirus, it’s essential not to touch any part of your face. To wipe away tears or remove makeup, use a clean tissue.

  • Don’t share your personal things

As generous as you may feel about letting others use your personal items, now’s the time to keep things to yourself. For example, the CDC recommends not sharing eye drops, makeup, makeup brushes, contact lenses cases, pillowcases, or towels. Pink eye is highly contagious.

  • Consider wearing glasses instead of contacts

While there’s currently no evidence to prove that wearing contacts raises your risks of contracting the novel coronavirus, there’s some evidence that shows you can get Covid-19 by touching a contaminated surface and then touching your eyes. In general, contact lenses wearers touch their eyes more often than people who wear eyeglasses, so it may be smart to make a temporary switch from contact lenses to glasses. However, this is only a friendly recommendation and not a hard-and-fast rule. If you prefer to stick with wearing contacts, washing your hands thoroughly can help keep you and your eyes safe.

Treatment for conjunctivitis

Regardless of whether your pink eye is caused by coronavirus or a different virus, there is no treatment for viral conjunctivitis. Usually, it goes away on its own within one to two weeks.

To alleviate your painful symptoms, eye doctors recommend:

  • Taking an over-the-counter pain medication, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen or any anti-inflammatory drug
  • Applying a warm compress on your eye for a few minutes; take care to use a clean wash cloth each time and for each eye
  • Use artificial tears (lubricating eye drops) to soothe your eye irritation; don’t touch the bottle tip to your eye

Are you sick and have pink eye symptoms?

Now is not the time to make a DIY diagnosis. Eye redness, even if you have a virus, doesn’t necessarily indicate that you have conjunctivitis. A wide range of other conditions can lead to the same symptoms. Contact an eye doctor near you for help to figure out what’s causing your eye pain. Don’t visit your eye care practice without calling for guidance first, because extra precautions must be taken with patients who may have COVID-19.

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 314-423-3874 or book an appointment online to see one of our Overland eye doctors.

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What Is 20/20 Vision?

If your last eye exam revealed that you have 20/20 vision, you probably walked out of the eye care center with a big smile! It’s a great feeling to be able to see without eyeglasses or contact lenses. However, did you know that 20/20 vision is not the same as having perfect vision? So what is it? What is perfect vision?

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, when Dr. Sara Schmitz, O.D. announces the results of your eye exam, he is reporting on your visual acuity, which is the clarity of your eyesight. These numbers describe how well your eyes can see an object that’s 20 feet away. If you can see it clearly, then your vision is considered “normal” – but not “perfect.” That’s because even if you have 20/20 vision, you could still have problems with peripheral vision, color vision, eye coordination, focusing, or depth perception. To find out your visual acuity and total eye health, book an eye exam with our Overland, Missouri, optometrist near you.

How does my eye doctor test visual acuity?

Typically, every eye exam and vision screening includes having you read the Snellen Eye Chart. This diagnostic tool appears as lines of block letters and numbers printed in progressively smaller sizes. The first line will display one huge letter, such as an “E”, and as you move down the chart row by row, the letters get smaller, and there are more of them per line. The lower down on the chart you can read correctly, the closer you are to being diagnosed with 20/20 vision. The bottom row (eight down) is 20/20 vision.

What if I don’t have 20/20 vision?

Don’t worry, you’re in good company! Statistics say that almost half of US adults don’t have 20/20 vision.

Depending on what your visual acuity is, you may need vision correction with prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses, or LASIK refractive surgery, to help you achieve 20/20 vision, or close to it. But not everyone can get to 20/20 – even with corrective treatment. In other words, some people can only see at 60 feet what others with normal vision can see at 20 feet (=20/60 vision). However, that doesn’t mean you can’t see well enough to function. For example:

  • If our eye care professional detects that you have 20/40 vision, it’s still enough to get a driver’s license.
  • If you have 20/80 vision, you should still be able to read headlines in a newspaper and tell the time on an alarm clock placed 10 feet away.
  • If your visual acuity deteriorates to 20/200 vision, you’ll be classified as legally blind.

Can I have better than 20/20 vision?

Sure, especially if you’re a bird of prey! Falcons see about eight times better than humans, with a visual acuity of about 20/2. All jokes aside, even humans can have vision that’s sharper than 20/20, such as 20/15. That means you can back up five feet during your eye exam and still read the Snellen eye chart the same as a person with normal vision standing five feet closer to the chart.

Why do I need good vision?

There are lots of reasons why it’s smart to invest in good vision by visiting our Overland eye care center near you for regular eye exams. Don’t underestimate the value of sharp, healthy vision in your life! Here are a few important benefits of 20/20 vision:

  • Reading with ease: reading is essential for day-to-day life, whether you read the newspaper, your smartphone, documents at work, letters and bills, or just want to enjoy a good novel.
  • Comfort: without sharp vision, you’ll need to squint all the time, leading to headaches and muscle strain.
  • Safety: activities such as driving and biking become extremely hazardous if you can’t see. Even if you’re just taking a walk, having sharp visual acuity will help prevent you from tripping and falling.
  • Quality of life: clear eyesight goes far towards your quality of life! Without sharp vision, who knows what scenes and wonderful moments you’ll miss out on?

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we’ll help you to see the best that you can see! Contact our Overland, Missouri, optometrist to schedule an eye exam near you today.

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 314-423-3874 or book an appointment online to see one of our Overland eye doctors.

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VR Goggles Safety Guide for Your Vision

Learn how to use the Oculus and protect your eyes from CVS and blue light

Virtual reality goggles are rapidly becoming the hottest must-have gaming device. They immerse you fully into a different world, a fantastic realm. And let’s face it, who doesn’t want to be transported to a new and fascinating place?

All you need to do is put a pair of VR goggles over your eyes and you can dash around, battle the enemy, race, and fly away.

However, we also need to face reality and consider the safety of these clever VR goggles, such as the Oculus. Our Overland and St. Charles eye doctors addresses your questions about the effects of this technology on vision and long-term eye health.

Do VR goggles lead to computer vision syndrome (CVS)?

Most types of VR headsets contain LCD monitors that project images at each eye, and the resulting stereoscopic effect creates an illusion of 3D. In order to accomplish this, the monitors must be placed very close to the eyes. As a result, eye strain and the irritating symptoms of CVS are a real-world concern.

Also, especially with young kids who tend to wear headsets like the Oculus for hours on end, prolonged exposure to this unnatural visual position can interfere with the healthy development of focusing, depth perception, and tracking.

Another common symptom of CVS that may occur is “cybersickness”, a type of motion sickness characterized by dizziness and nausea that can continue to disturb you even after you remove the VR goggles. It results from the mismatch of visual information and body posture.

In an interesting twist, while the bothersome and unhealthy symptoms of CVS are definitely a concern, VR goggles can also be used to enhance vision development. When used under the guidance of a qualified optometrist, some VR goggles can improve visual acuity, strengthen eye muscle weakness, and boost eye-hand coordination, reaction time, eye coordination, and depth perception.

What about blue light and CVS?

The jury is still out about the long-term effects of HEV (high energy visible light), also known as blue light, but research indicates that it may raise your risk of developing eye disease in the future. In addition, blue light flickers – which can stress your eyes and lead to headaches and other problems associated with CVS.

Fortunately, these fears about the hazards of blue light don’t have to get in the way of your high-tech leisure. Newer VR goggles are available with protective blue light filters built-in to the lens. Ask our team Overland Optical Family Eye Care about the latest, eye health friendly VR headsets.

How can you enjoy VR and avoid CVS?

Taking a few precautions can enable you to embrace the innovative tech of virtual reality and keep your vision safe. Our Overland, Missouri, eye doctor shares these tips:

  • Limit your (and your kid’s) time wearing the Oculus and exploring VR. Play for a half-hour at a time, and take a break every 5 minutes to walk around and reestablish your equilibrium.
  • Choose a slow speed for your main character and avoid making any quick or sudden movements within your VR world
  • Adjust the lenses of your VR goggles to meet the particular needs of your eyes.
  • Set your VR goggles for low brightness and a comfortable contrast
  • Don’t use headsets like the Oculus when you’re feeling sleepy or under the influence of alcohol, medication, or other drugs

Real-life eye exams are essential

Along with listening to the warnings and advice above, we encourage you to book regular comprehensive eye exams in our eye care center near you. Our advanced technology and optometric equipment may not be as exciting as spending time in a virtual world, but it will help to keep your vision healthy!

At Overland Optical Family Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 314-423-3874 or book an appointment online to see one of our Overland and St. Charles eye doctors.

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Is School Work Causing Computer Vision Syndrome in Your Child?

Eye health tips for students from our Overland eye doctor

The start of fall means back-to-school for kids of all ages – and our team at Overland Optical Family Eye Care wishes everyone a smooth and successful return to the classroom!

When your child enters school after a summer of outdoor fun, many of the summer’s vision hazards are left behind. Yet, that doesn’t mean all eye health risks are eliminated! Nowadays, the majority of learning is computer based – exposing students’ eyes to the pain and dangers of blue light and computer vision syndrome. Fortunately, a variety of helpful devices and smartphone apps are available to block blue light and keep your child’s vision safe and comfortable.

To help you safeguard your child’s vision for the upcoming semesters and the long term of life, our Overland optometrist explains all about computer vision syndrome and how to prevent it.

Symptoms of computer vision syndrome

It’s smart to familiarize yourself with the signs of computer vision syndrome. If your child complains about any of these common symptoms, you can help prevent any lasting vision damage by booking an eye exam with our Overland eye doctor near you:

  • Eye irritation and redness
  • Neck, shoulder and back pain
  • Blurry vision
  • Dry eyes, due to reduced blinking
  • Headaches

Basics of blue light

Students spend endless hours in front of digital screens, be it a computer monitor, tablet, or smartphone. There is homework to be done, research to be conducted, texting with friends, and movies and gaming during downtime. All of this screen time exposes your child’s eyes to blue light.

Many research studies have demonstrated that flickering blue light – the shortest, highest-energy wavelength of visible light – can lead to tired eyes, headaches, and blurry vision. Additionally, blue light can disrupt the sleep/wake cycle, causing sleep deprivation and all the physical and mental health problems associated with it. As for your child’s future eye health, blue light may also be linked to the later development of macular degeneration and retinal damage.

How to avoid computer vision syndrome

Our Overland eye doctor shares the following ways to block blue light and protect against computer vision syndrome:

  • Computer glasses, eyeglasses lenses treated with a blue-light blocking coating, and contact lenses with built-in blue light protection are all effective ways to optimize visual comfort when working in front of a screen. These optics reduce eye strain and prevent hazardous blue-light radiation from entering the eyes.
  • Practice the 20-20-20 rule; pause every 20 minutes to gaze at an object that’s 20 feet away for 20 seconds. This simple behavior gives eyes a chance to rest from the intensity of the computer or smartphone screen, preventing eye fatigue.
  • Prescription glasses can be helpful when using a computer for long periods – even for students who don’t generally need prescription eyewear. A weak prescription can take the stress off of your child’s eyes, decreasing fatigue and increasing their ability to concentrate. Our Overland optometrist will perform a personalized eye exam to determine the most suitable prescription.
  • Moisturize vision with eye drops. One of the most common symptoms of computer vision syndrome is dry eyes, namely because people forget to blink frequently enough. Equip your child with a bottle of preservative-free artificial tears eye drops (available over the counter) and remind them to blink!
  • Blue light filters can be installed on a computer, smartphone, and all digital screens to minimize exposure to blue. A range of helpful free apps are also available for download.
  • Limit screen time for your child each day, or encourage breaks at least once an hour. Typically, the degree of discomfort from computer vision syndrome is in direct proportion with the amount of time your child spends viewing digital screens.
  • Set the proper screen distance. Younger children (elementary school) should view their computer at a half-arm’s length away from their eyes, just below eye level. Kids in middle school and high school should sit about 20 – 28 inches from the screen, with the top of the screen at eye level.

For additional info, book a consultation and eye exam at Overland Optical Family Eye Care

When you and your child meet with our Overland eye doctor, we’ll ask questions about your child’s school and study habits to provide customized recommendations on the most effective ways to stay safe from computer vision syndrome and blue light. Our optometrist stays up-to-date with the latest optic technologies and methods to prevent painful vision and eye health damage from using a computer, so you can depend on us for contemporary, progressive treatment.

Stop squinting – Contact Lens Sunglasses Exist!

Sunglasses have always been your go-to for shading your eyes to stop squinting in the sun, but they’re not always the most convenient accessory. They fog up and slip down your nose when you work up a sweat, and need to be wiped off when you’re hit by water spray at the beach. But what’s the alternative? Is there another way to protect your eyes from UV rays and soothe your vision from the blinding Overland, Missouri, light?

Our Overland Optical Family Eye Care eye doctors are pleased to offer a revolutionary solution – the new ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™ Light Intelligent Technology™ contact lenses. These contact lenses that can act like sunglasses were given FDA approval in April 2018. And they were also awarded to be one of TIME’s Best Inventions of 2018.

Now that we’ve caught your eye with this hot new tech, read on for more info about Acuvue’s contact lenses sunglasses from your favorite Overland, Missouri optometrists’ office.

Smart & Dynamic Contact Lenses

ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™ Light Intelligent Technology™ are the first contacts to be developed that “read” the light conditions in your environment and adapt to enhance your vision. These lenses use photochromic technology that was designed in partnership with Transitions™, the leading manufacturer of photochromic eyeglasses lenses. The contacts incorporate a special additive that darkens automatically when exposed to light.

When exposed to outdoor UV and/or blue light from digital devices, these contacts react quickly. And because they respond “intelligently” to changing light conditions outdoors, the lenses do not typically remain in the darkest state the whole time you’re outside. So when you’re on an open stretch of beach, they’re not the same as when you’re standing under the shade of a wide awning. The effects on the appearance of your eyes is minimal, and when you come indoors, they fade back to clear within 60 seconds.

Sharper, Safer Vision – All Day Long

Surveys estimate that 94% of all consumers compensate for bright light conditions by squinting, dimming indoor lights, reducing screen brightness, or shading their eyes. ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™ Light Intelligent Technology™ filter indoor and outdoor light, including blue light rays that threaten your eye health. At night, these contact lenses sunglasses are also useful, as they reduce haloes and starburst. Your vision will improve during all hours of the day.

See the Benefits of Contact Lenses Sunglasses

  • Experience the comfort and convenience of going frame-free – while still safeguarding your vision
  • Highest level of UV protection in a contact lens
  • When you go into a darker environment, these contacts help your vision recover from bright light up to 5 seconds faster than normal
  • Ultimate gain, with only a minimal change to the appearance of your eyes and face
  • Crisp nighttime vision, with no disturbing haloes or starbursts
  • Soothing vision all day long, without bothersome glare

Visit our Overland, Missouri, eye doctor to try ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™

We’re thrilled to offer these breakthrough contacts at Overland Optical Family Eye Care! Our eye doctors would like to point out that while these contact lenses sunglasses are truly remarkable, we don’t recommend that you use them to replace your sunglasses all of the time.

While they offer exceptional UV protection to the areas they cover, contact lenses still leave other parts of your eyes and the surrounding ocular tissue naked to UV light. Sunglasses cover a wider area and therefore give additional protection. In addition, car windshields block close to 100% of UV light, so your ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™ won’t darken when you’re behind the wheel. To solve that problem, they can easily be worn under non-prescription sunglasses. So when you visit Overland Optical Family Eye Care for your contact lenses fitting, check out our nonprescription sunglasses collection too!

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